Ticket #9819: 9819.diff

File 9819.diff, 7.5 KB (added by thejaswi_puthraya, 6 years ago)

git-patch against the latest checkout

  • docs/ref/contrib/comments/index.txt

    diff --git a/docs/ref/contrib/comments/index.txt b/docs/ref/contrib/comments/index.txt
    index 880be34..5626446 100644
    a b More information 
    231231   custom
    232232   forms
    233233   moderation
     234   example
  • new file docs/ref/contrib/comments/example.txt

    diff --git a/docs/ref/contrib/comments/example.txt b/docs/ref/contrib/comments/example.txt
    new file mode 100644
    index 0000000..b852c08
    - +  
     1.. _ref-contrib-comments-example:
     2
     3===========================================
     4Example of using the in-built comments app
     5===========================================
     6
     7#. Follow the first three steps of the quick start guide in the
     8   :ref:`documentation <ref-contrib-comments-index>`.
     9
     10#. Now suppose, you have an app (``blog``) with a model (``Post``)
     11   to which you want to attach comments. Let us also suppose that
     12   you have a template called ``blog_detail.html`` where you want
     13   to display the comments list and comment form.
     14
     15#. First, we should load the ``comment`` template tags in the
     16   ``blog_detail.html`` so that we can use it's functionality. So
     17   just like all other custom template tag libraries::
     18
     19       {% load comments %}
     20
     21#. Next, let us add the number of comments attached to the particular
     22   model instance of ``Post``. For this we assume that a context
     23   variable ``object_pk`` is present which gives the ``id`` of the
     24   instance of ``Post``.
     25
     26   The usage of the ``get_comment_count`` tag is like below::
     27
     28      {% get_comment_count for blog.post object_pk as comment_count %}
     29      <p>{{ comment_count }} comments have been posted.</p>
     30
     31   If you have the instance (say ``entry``) of the model (``Post``)
     32   available in the context, then you can refer to it directly::
     33
     34      {% get_comment_count for entry as comment_count %}
     35      <p>{{ comment_count }} comments have been posted.</p>
     36
     37#. To get a list of comments, we make use of the ``get_comment_list`` tag.
     38   This tag's usage is very similar to the ``get_comment_count`` tag. We
     39   need to remember that the ``get_comment_list`` returns a list of comments
     40   and hence we will have to iterate through them to display them::
     41
     42      {% get_comment_list for blog.post object_pk as comment_list %}
     43      {% for comment in comment_list %}
     44      <p>Posted by: {{ comment.user_name }} on {{ comment.submit_date }}</p>
     45      ...
     46      <p>Comment: {{ comment.comment }}</p>
     47      ...
     48      {% endfor %}
     49
     50#. Finally, we display the comment form, enabling users to enter their comments.
     51   There are two ways of doing so. The first is when you want to display the
     52   comments template available under your ``comments/form.html``. The other method
     53   gives you a chance to customize the form.
     54
     55   The first method makes use of the ``render_comment_form`` tag. It's usage too is
     56   similar to the other two tags we have discussed above::
     57
     58      {% render_comment_form for entry %}
     59
     60   It looks for the ``form.html`` under the following directories (for our example)::
     61
     62      comments/blog/post/form.html
     63      comments/blog/form.html
     64      comments/form.html
     65
     66   Since we customize the form in the second method, we make use of another tag called
     67   ``get_comment_target``. This tag on rendering gives the URL where the comment form is
     68   posted. Without any :ref:`customization <ref-contrib-comments-custom>`, ``get_comment_target``
     69   evaluates to ``/comments/post/``. We use this tag in the form's ``action`` attribute. The
     70   ``get_comment_form`` tag renders a ``form`` for a model instance by creating a context
     71   variable. One can iterate over the ``form`` object to get individual fields. This gives
     72   you fine-grain control over the form::
     73
     74     {% for field in form %}
     75     {% ifequal field.name "comment" %}
     76       <!-- Customize the "comment" field, say, make CSS changes -->
     77     ...
     78     {% endfor %}
     79
     80   But let's look at a simple example::
     81
     82     {% get_comment_form for entry as form %}
     83     <!-- A context variable called form is created with the necessary hidden fields,
     84     timestamps and security hashes -->
     85     <table>
     86     <form action="{% comment_form_target %}" method="POST">
     87       {{ form }}
     88       <tr>
     89         <td></td>
     90         <td><input type="submit" name="preview" class="submit-post" value="Preview"></td>
     91       </tr>
     92     </form>
     93     </table>
     94
     95#. If you want your users to be able to flag comments (say for profanity), you can just direct them
     96   (by placing a link in your comment list) to ``/flag/{{ comment.id }}/``. Similarly, a user with
     97   requisite permissions (``"Can moderate comments"``) can approve and delete comments. This can
     98   also be done through the ``admin`` as you'll see later. You might also want to customize the
     99   following templates:
     100
     101     * ``flag.html``
     102     * ``flagged.html``
     103     * ``approve.html``
     104     * ``approved.html``
     105     * ``delete.html``
     106     * ``deleted.html``
     107
     108   found under the directory structure we saw for ``form.html``.
     109
     110#. Suppose you want to export a :ref:`feed <ref-contrib-syndication>` of the latest comments,
     111   you can use the in-built :class:`LatestCommentFeed`. Just enable it in your project's ``urls.py``::
     112
     113     from django.conf.urls.defaults import *
     114     from django.contrib.comments.feeds import LatestCommentFeed
     115
     116     feeds = {
     117         'latest': LatestCommentFeed,
     118     }
     119
     120     urlpatterns = patterns('',
     121     # ...
     122       (r'^feeds/(?P<url>.*)/$', 'django.contrib.syndication.views.feed',
     123          {'feed_dict': feeds}),
     124     # ...
     125     )
     126
     127   Now you should have the latest comment feeds being served off ``/feeds/latest/``.
     128
     129#. Now that we have the comments framework working, we might want to have some moderation setup
     130   to administer the comments. The comments framework comes in-built with
     131   :ref:`generic comment moderation <ref-contrib-comments-moderation>`. The comment moderation
     132   has the following features (all of which or only certain can be enabled):
     133
     134     * Enable comments for a particular model instance.
     135     * Close comments after a particular (user-defined) number of days.
     136     * Email new comments to the site-staff.
     137
     138#. To enable comment moderation, we subclass the :class:`CommentModerator` and register it with
     139   the moderation features we want. Let us suppose we want to close comments after 7 days of
     140   posting and also send out an email to the site staff. In ``blog/models.py``, we register a
     141   comment moderator in the following way::
     142
     143     from django.contrib.comments.moderation import CommentModerator, moderator
     144     from django.db import models
     145
     146     class Post(models.Model):
     147         title   = models.CharField(max_length = 255)
     148         content = models.TextField()
     149         posted_date = models.DateTimeField()
     150
     151     class PostModerator(CommentModerator):
     152         email_notification = True
     153         auto_close_field   = 'posted_date'
     154         # Close the comments after 7 days.
     155         close_after        = 7
     156
     157     moderator.register(Post, PostModerator)
     158
     159#. The generic comment moderation also has the facility to remove comments. These comments can
     160   then be moderated by any user who has access to the ``admin`` site and the
     161   ``Can moderate comments`` permission (can be set under the ``Users`` page in the ``admin``).
     162
     163#. The moderator can ``Flag``, ``Approve`` or ``Remove`` comments using the ``Action`` drop-down
     164   in the ``admin`` under the ``Comments`` page.
     165
     166   .. note::
     167
     168        Only a super-user will be able to delete comments from the database. ``Remove Comments``
     169        only sets the ``is_public`` attribute to ``False``.
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